Crackdown On Bitcoin In UK Over Money Laundering, Tax Evasion

The Treasury of the UK has announced plans to strongly regulate the transfer of cryptocurrencieswith a view to cracking down on money laundering and tax evasion. The regulations have not been stipulated with specificity, but will certainly include anti-money laundering (AML) and know your customer (KYC) details.

The regulation is intended to take force before the end of 2017, or just at the beginning of 2018. The increased regulations, in line with the directives in the EU, are intended to limit the amount of anonymity possible for cryptocurrency traders. According to John Mann, one of the Treasury committee:

“These new forms of exchange are expanding rapidly and we’ve got to make sure we don’t get left behind – that’s particularly important in terms of money-laundering, terrorism or pure theft. I’m not convinced that the regulatory authorities are keeping up to speed. I would be surprised if the committee doesn’t have an inquiry next year. It would be timely to have a proper look at what this means. It may be that we want to speed up our use of these kinds of thing in this country, but that makes it all the more important that we don’t have a regulatory lag.”

Other regulations

Other regulations have been threatened around the world, as Bitcoin price soars. With adoption exploding, and massive influx of institutional capital via futures and other contracts, Bitcoin is becoming far more of a financial reality that it has ever been before. China, Russia, and other countries have made it clear that the digital currency will be off-limits, while other countries like Switzerland and Malta are seemingly far more open.

ICE Agent: Cryptocurrencies Increasingly Used in Money Laundering

By: Nikhilesh De

Criminal organizations are increasingly using cryptocurrencies to launder money or otherwise pay for illicit activities, according to one U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent.

Child exploiters, drug smugglers, illegal firearm sellers and intellectual property rights violators are all beginning to use cryptocurrencies for their transactions, said Matthew Allen, ICE’s special agent in charge of Homeland Security Investigations (HSI).

Allen testified to the Senate Judiciary Committee on modernizing anti-money-laundering laws to limit both laundering and terrorist financing on Nov. 28, explaining that virtual currencies are the newest major method for hiding criminal proceeds.

In his testimony, he said:

“HSI agents are increasingly encountering virtual currency, including more recent, anonymity enhancing cryptocurrencies (AECs), in the course of their investigations. AECs are designed to better obfuscate transaction information and are increasingly preferred by [transnational criminal organizations].”

Some exchanges are beginning to design services specifically to thwart tracking by use of mixers that anonymize virtual currency addresses, making it even more difficult to determine which user conducted a particular transaction, Allen said.

Drug arrests

The department has had some success in identifying criminals who use bitcoin, however. Allen pointed to the November 2016 arrest of Utah resident Aaron Shamo, who allegedly ran a Xanax and fentanyl manufacturer group.

Shamo allegedly took his profits in bitcoin, and HSI seized approximately $2.5 million from him at the time.

Another alleged fentanyl vendor, Pennsylvanian Henry Koffie, was arrested this past July and had $154,000 seized. Allen said Koffie sold nearly 8,000 orders of the drug, “most of it paid for with bitcoin.”

https://www.coindesk.com/ice-director-cryptocurrencies-are-increasingly-being-used-in-money-laundering/

JPMorgan busted for money laundering after accusing bitcoin of doing the same

The Swiss subsidiary of US bank JPMorgan Chase has been sanctioned by Switzerland’s financial regulator FINMA for money laundering and “seriously violating supervision laws,” according to the local weekly Handelszeitung.

The sanctions are reportedly related to breaches of due diligence in connection with money laundering standards. That literally means the Wall Street banking giant assisted in money laundering.

The ruling was reportedly issued on June 30, but the regulator did not make it known as JPMorgan has been actively trying to prevent the publication. The Federal Administrative Court has since dismissed an appeal by the bank.

It is two months since JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon slammed bitcoin, the world’s leading cryptocurrency, labeling it a fraud. According to Dimon, bitcoin could be useful “if you were a drug dealer or a murderer.”

Dimon also compared bitcoin to the 17th-century Dutch tulip mania bubble. At the time, the CEO predicted the eventual demise of the digital currency and pledged to fire any trader trading bitcoin for being stupid.

“A fiat currency is when a government says this is your legal tender, you have to give it and accept it, and of course the central bank can misuse it and inflate it. But what is the use case for bitcoin? You’re in Venezuela, North Korea, you’re a criminal. Great product!” he said during a news conference in Washington.