Bitcoin Hedge Fund and CEO Slapped With $2.5 Million Penalty for Ponzi Scheme

A New York federal court has ordered cryptocurrency hedge fund Gelfman Blueprint, Inc. (GBI) and its CEO Nicholas Gelfman to pay over $2.5 million for operating a fraudulent Ponzi scheme, according to an official announcement published Oct. 18.

GBI is a New York-based corporation and denominated Bitcoin (BTC) hedge fund incorporated in 2014. As stated on the company’s website, by 2015 it had 85 customers and 2,367 BTC under management.

The order is the continuation of the initial anti-fraud enforcement action filed by the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) against GBI in September 2017. The CFTC charged GBI for allegedly running a Ponzi scheme from 2014 to 2016, telling investors that it had developed a computer algorithm called “Jigsaw” which allowed for substantial returns through a commodity fund. In reality, the entire scheme was a fraud.

Per the announcement, GBI and Gelfman fraudulently solicited over $600,000 from at least 80 customers. Moreover, Gelfman set up a fake computer “hack” to conceal the scheme’s trading losses. It eventually resulted in the loss of almost all customer funds.

The current order charges GBI and Gelfman to pay over $2.5 million in civil monetary penalties and restitution. GBI and Gelfman are ordered to pay $554,734.48 and $492,064.53 in restitution to customers and $1,854,000 and $177,501 in civil monetary penalties, respectively.

James McDonald, the CFTC’s Director of Enforcement, said that “this case marks yet another victory for the Commission in the virtual currency enforcement arena. As this string of cases shows, the CFTC is determined to identify bad actors in these virtual currency markets and hold them accountable.”

Last month, the CFTC filed a suit with the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Texas against two defendants for the allegedly fraudulent solicitation of BTC. Per the suit, defendants Morgan Hunt and Kim Hecroft were running two fraudulent businesses and misleading the public to invest in leveraged or margined foreign currency contracts, such as forex, binary options, and diamonds.

https://cointelegraph.com/news/bitcoin-hedge-fund-and-ceo-slapped-with-25-million-penalty-for-ponzi-scheme

Microsoft engineer charged with money laundering over Reveton ransomware

A Microsoft employee has been arrested on suspicion of infecting victims with the Reveton ransomware, and money laundering.

Forty-one year-old Raymond Uadiale, who worked as a network engineer for the software giant, faces a 20-year federal prison sentence for playing a key role in the global ransomware campaign, if found guilty.

Law enforcement officials explained that the UK citizen installed the ransomware onto victim’s computers, while Uadiale looked after the financial side. He would transfer payments to K!NG.

Reveton is one of the earliest strains of ransomware. When a cyber criminal installs it into someone’s computer, their screen is instantly locked and they cannot gain re-entry until they pay a ransom fee.

Trojan:W32/Reveton is a ransomware application. It fraudulently claims to be from a legitimate law enforcement authority and prevents users from accessing their infected machine, demanding that a ‘fine’ must be paid to restore normal access,” according to security firm F5 Labs.

“After the Trojan successfully infects a machine, it will prevent the user from accessing the desktop and will display a fraudulent message alleging that the system was locked by a local law enforcement authority.

“The specific authority mentioned varies depending on the affected user’s location, though most of the samples we have seen mainly mentioned various European authorities.”

In the past, most ransomware attacks have demanded payment in Bitcoin. However, in this particular attack, the hackers asked victims to purchase GreenDot MoneyPak vouchers – a form of bank pre-payment debit card.

The victims had to enter the voucher code into a screen locker, and from here, K!NG would transfer the money to a debit card obtained by Uadiale.

Throughout the campaign, Uadiale used the fake name of Mike Roland. After shifting the money into Liberty Reserve, a centralised digital currency based in Costa Rica, the attackers pocketed more than $130,000.

Uadiale used Liberty Reserve as a form of money laundering. However, Liberty Reserve was closed down by US authorities in May 2013 and its servers seized. The creator of Liberty Reserve was sentenced to 20 years in prison in May 2016.

If convicted of the charges, Uadiale could spend up to 20 years in prison and be ordered to pay a $500,000 fine. He is currently on bail.

Eight people charged with online romance money laundering scam

COLUMBUS (WCMH) — Eight people from Central Ohio have been charged in federal court for an online romance scam.

According to the Department of Justice eight men charged on Valentine’s Day have been indicted by a grand jury for conspiring to launder and for laundering the proceeds of online romance scams.

According to the indictment, the eight men created several profiles on online dating sites and then contacted men and women throughout the United States developing a sense of affection, and often, fake romantic relationship with the victims.

Those charged include: Kwabena M. Bonsu, Kwasi A. Oppong, Kwame Ansah, John Y. Amoah, Samuel Antwi, King Faisal Hamidu, Nkosiyoxoxo Msuthu and Cynthia Appiagyei.

After establishing relationships, perpetrators of the romance scams allegedly requested money, typically for investment or need-based reasons, and provided account information and directions for where money should be sent. In part, these accounts were controlled by the defendants. Typical wire amounts ranged from $10,000 to more than $100,000 per wire

The funds were not used for the purposes claimed by the perpetrators of the romance scams. Instead, the defendants conducted transactions designed to conceal, such as withdrawing cash, transferring funds to other accounts and purchasing assets and sending the assets overseas.

“According to the indictment, the defendants laundered the funds from a scheme to seduce victims throughout the United States using dating websites like Match.com and then defrauding them of millions of dollars,” U.S. Attorney Benjamin C. Glassman said

It is alleged that the individuals commonly used some the fraud proceeds to purchase salvaged vehicles sold online. The cars were commonly exported to Ghana.

Fictitious reasons for investment requests included gold, diamond, oil and gas pipeline opportunities in Africa. Websites used involve Match.com, ChristianMingle.com, BabyBoomerPeopleMeet.com, PlentyofFish.com, OurTime.com, EHarmony.com and Facebook. At least 26 victims have been identified thus far.

In one example, a victim believed she was in a serious relationship with a person named “Frank Wilberg” whom she met on Match.com. She believed they planned to marry and paid $3,000 to reserve a wedding site, and had purchased a wedding gown and shoes.

Wilberg” told the victim he owned a consulting firm that tested gold for purity and needed money to buy gold and gold contracts. He said he expected to profit $6 million and would repay her with the profits. The victim wired money to accounts controlled by Amoah, Bonsu, Msuthu, and Appiagyei, and did not receive any money back.

In furtherance of the scheme, the co-conspirators allegedly created several companies, some of which were shell companies, to help attempt to hide the true nature of their proceeds

 

Bitcoin laundering suspect caught in US, Russia extradition spat

The two countries are fighting over where the Russian national should have his day in court.

By  for Zero Day

http://www.zdnet.com/article/bitcoin-launderer-suspect-caught-in-us-russia-extradition-spat/

Alexander Vinnik is a popular man, with both the United States and Russia fighting over which country has the right to charge the suspected Bitcoin laundering mastermind.

Vinnik, a 38-year-old Russian national, is at the heart of the fight as the suspected leader of a Bitcoin laundering scheme.

In July, Vinnik was arrested by US law enforcement for allegedly being involved in BTC-e, a cryptocurrency exchange platform which “washed” funds without taking customer information, allowing for laundering to take place.

According to US prosecutors, Vinnik owned a number of accounts on the platform and used them to launder cash — and may have also been involved in laundering Bitcoin received from the “hack” of now-defunct exchange platform Mt. Gox, as well as Tradehill, another dead exchange.

In total, the Bitcoin laundering scheme is believed to have laundered roughly $4 billion.

Mt. Gox was once a thriving Bitcoin exchange, but after its sudden collapse in 2014, investors lost roughly $375 million. Former CEO Mark Karpeles originally blamed the closure on unknown cyberattackers, but Japanese law enforcement is charging him with embezzlement.

It is believed that Vinnik not only funneled proceeds from Mt. Gox but has also been involved in identity theft and drug trafficking schemes.

US law enforcement wants to charge Vinnik on American soil with operating an unlicensed money service business, conspiracy to commit money laundering, money laundering, and engaging in unlawful monetary transactions.

If convicted, Vinnik could face up to 55 years behind bars.

The Russian national is currently being held in Greece, and a local court in Thessaloniki ruled on Wednesday that the United States is permitted to extradite him to face these charges.

However, the Russian government is not impressed with the Greek court’s decision.

On Friday, the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs said in a statement that the verdict was “unjust and a violation of international law.”

The ministry believes that as Vinnik is a Russian national, he should be prosecuted in his home country and this should overrule any other extradition requests. The Russian Prosecutor General’s Office requested an extradition order to Russia, but it appears this request has been ignored by the Greek authorities.

“Based on legal precedent, the Russian request should take priority as Mr. Vinnik is a citizen of Russia,” the ministry said. “The verdict is even more surprising in the context of the atmosphere of friendly relations between Russia and Greece.”

Vinnik has denied the charges but has agreed to be sent back to Russia, according to the Reuters news agency.

However, Vinnik’s legal team have appealed the ruling, and now the Russian national’s case will be considered by the Supreme Civil and Criminal Court of Greece, before being submitted to the Greek Minister of Justice for approval.

“We hope the Greek authorities will consider the Russian Prosecutor General’s Office request, and Russia’s reasoning, and act in strict compliance with international law,” the ministry says.

ZDNet has reached out to the US Department of Justice (DoJ) and Greek Ministry of Foreign Affairs and will update if we hear back.

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